Aldridge with 45 points in an intense game to beat Utah in OT. Feels like the playoffs started already for half the western conference. πŸ€

→ 2018/03/23 10:29 pm

Reviewing the timeline algorithm this morning. Doesn’t look like it needs any changes: ORDER BY posted_at DESC.

→ 2018/03/23 11:44 am

IndieWeb generation 4 and hosted domains

Naturally because of the goals of, I see a lot of discussion about “owning your content”. It’s an important part of the mission for to take control back from closed, ad-supported social networks and instead embrace posting on our own blogs again.

But what does it mean to own our content? Do we have to install WordPress or some home-grown blogging system for it to be considered true content ownership, where we have the source code and direct SFTP access to the server? No. If that’s our definition, then content ownership will be permanently reserved for programmers and technical folks who have hours to spend on server configuration.

IndieWebCamp has a generations chart to illustrate the path from early adopters to mainstream users. Eli Mellen highlighted it in a recent post about the need to bridge the gap between the technical aspects of IndieWeb tools and more approachable platforms. With specifically, the goal is “generation 4”, and I think we’re on track to get there.

I want blogging to be as easy as tweeting. Anything short of that isn’t good enough for You’ll notice when you use Twitter that they never ask you to SFTP into to configure your account. They don’t ask you to install anything.

More powerful software that you can endlessly customize will always have its place. It’s good to have a range of options, including open source to tinker with. That’s often where some of the best ideas start. But too often I see people get lost in the weeds of plugins and themes, lured in by the myth that you have to self-host with WordPress to be part of the IndieWeb.

Owning your content isn’t about portable software. It’s about portable URLs and data. It’s about domain names.

When you write and post photos at your own domain name, your content can outlive any one blogging platform. This month marked the 16th anniversary of blogging at, and in that time I’ve switched blogging platforms and hosting providers a few times. The posts and URLs can all be preserved through those changes because it’s my own domain name.

I was disappointed when Medium announced they were discontinuing support for custom domain names. I’m linking to the Internet Archive copy because Medium’s help page about this is no longer available. If “no custom domains” is still their policy, it’s a setback for the open web, and dooms Medium to the same dead-end as URLs.

If you can’t use your own domain name, you can’t own it. Your content will be forever stuck at those silo URLs, beholden to the whims of the algorithmic timeline and shifting priorities of the executive team.

For hosted blogs on, we encourage everyone to map a custom domain to their content, and we throw in free SSL and preserve redirects for old posts on imported WordPress content. There’s more we can do.

I’m working on the next version of the macOS app for now, which features multiple accounts and even multiple blogs under the same account. Here’s a screenshot of the settings screen:

Mac screenshot

The goal with is not to be a stop-gap hosting provider, with truly “serious” users eventually moving on to something else (although we make that easy). We want hosting to be the best platform for owning your content and participating in the and IndieWeb communities.

Sent a Kickstarter update to backers. I don’t usually ask for anything, but decided to close the email suggesting you invite a few friends to I know a lot of people are deleting Facebook this week, so maybe they’re looking for a new community too.

→ 2018/03/21 3:12 pm

Some extra delays in posting this morning. Should be getting back to normal now.

→ 2018/03/19 10:16 am

Watching more basketball as I work on some iOS stuff. Some great games today. Thought that UT would win a few, though. Now tuned into Kings/Warriors, tied in the 4th. πŸ€

→ 2018/03/16 11:32 pm

Noticed more people wanting a second microblog lately, so rolled out support for custom blog titles today. Each blog can have its own title, custom domain, design, etc. shared under a single username. (Or create a new account if you want it completely separate.)

→ 2018/03/16 3:59 pm

Latest home screen. Not many changes recently… Sunlit is new and replaces Instagram. and Ulysses in the dock and used often. Top and bottom rows blank.

→ 2018/03/16 1:23 pm

Rethinking the Apple Watch platform

David Smith has shared the stats he’s been collecting on Apple Watch usage from his apps, hoping that Apple will drop support for the original Apple Watch (Series 0) sooner rather than later:

So far the data is looking promising that this dream of mine might actually be possible. The Series 3 is being adopted incredibly quickly and just last week became the most popular Apple Watch overall amongst my users with 33% of the overall user-base. The Series 0 is steadily falling, currently at around 24%.

Federico Viticci adds this in his link from MacStories:

I’ve been wondering about when Apple could drop support for the original Apple Watch in new versions of watchOS. For context, the original iPhone, launched in 2007, couldn’t be updated to iOS 4 in 2010, three years later. The Apple Watch will have its official third anniversary next month.

The big difference between the Apple Watch and the original iPhone or iPad is that many people (perhaps most) do not run third-party apps on the watch. Those people are not even counted in David Smith’s numbers. Unlike the iPhone and iPad, which are significantly improved with new apps, the Apple Watch is pretty good with only the built-in Apple features.

After a few years, I still wear my Series 0 every day. Here’s what I use it for:

  • Telling time. Also glancing at the upcoming event.
  • Notifications from Slack and
  • Fitness. I don’t launch the Workout app. I just let the watch notice when I’m exercising.

For these tasks, performance and API support just don’t matter as much. The way I use my Apple Watch is the equivalent of someone who only tells a HomePod to play Apple Music and asks no other questions. A little sad, but it works fine and I expect to keep the Series 0 for another year or so before upgrading.

I feel for developers who want the Apple Watch to be a much more mature platform. I want that too. But I don’t think it’s as simple as copying what has worked for native apps on Apple’s other platforms.

The future of the Apple Watch isn’t just better widgets; it’s voice. Both WatchKit and Siri need a major shakeup. Apple should make Siri more consistent across Apple Watch, iPhone, and HomePod, with a more flexible server-based API like Alexa. If they can do that while also rethinking WatchKit at the same time, even better.

Spurs really needed that win against the Pelicans and got it. Great game. Whew. πŸ€

→ 2018/03/15 9:57 pm

Core Intuition 319 and WWDC

The latest Core Intuition is out. Daniel and I talk about WWDC and related topics for the full episode:

Daniel and Manton talk about Apple’s announcement that WWDC is officially happening in San Jose again. Daniel struggles to make a financial case for attending, while Manton continues to believe it’s essential to at least be in town for a few days. They talk about the possibility that other conferences would be a better use of time and money. Finally, they indulge a little speculation about WWDC and whether the promo art ever hints at any of the actual news to be announced.

Thanks for subscribing! Looking forward to seeing some Core Intuition listeners out in San Jose.

WWDC 2018 dates are set. I’ll be out in San Jose for a few days, and we’ll probably do a meetup again. Best of luck to everyone trying to get a ticket!

→ 2018/03/13 12:10 pm

Nice time at Open Coffee this morning. Just enough SXSW for me. Working outside at Halcyon for a little while.

→ 2018/03/13 11:03 am